Study: Brain injuries may affect females differently than males

Traumatic brain injuries are a common and serious health problem in New York and throughout the rest of the country. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over 2.5 million people incurred one of these injuries in 2010. A TBI occurs when a bump or blow to the head disrupts the brain's normal functioning patterns. Often, these injuries leave their victims with permanent disabilities, high medical bills and an inability to function normally.

The potential consequences of a TBI

Every person reacts differently and suffers from different effects following a brain injury. According to the Brain Injury Association of America, no two brain injuries are the same and their effects often depend on the location of the injury, how severe it is and what caused it. The CDC states that for some, the effects only result in a brief period of altered mental consciousness while for others, the effects lead to long-term episodes of unconsciousness and amnesia. Some of the short or long-term changes a person experiences after a brain injury can affect their:

  • Ability to think or remember things on a long-term and short-term basis

  • Sensations, such as their ability to taste, smell and touch

  • Communication skills, their ability to understand and how they express themselves

  • Emotions

For instance, one brain injury victim may suffer from an inability to remember the tasks that they have to do each day and decreased awareness of their surroundings while another may deal with issues with their emotional stability in addition to regular fatigue.

Females and brain injuries

While every person experiences different effects following a TBI, a new study discovered that girls may be more susceptible to behavioral problems, psychological distress and smoking than males after incurring a brain injury, states Time. To come to this conclusion, researchers surveyed nearly 10,000 students in middle school and high school in Canada who had suffered from a TBI. Of those surveyed, the girls were more likely to be targeted by bullies, smoke marijuana, experience psychological distress and consider committing suicide.

Since this information was collected using a self-reporting system, the researchers were not able to define exactly what caused these differences between female and male brain injury sufferers. However, it is suspected that these variances may be due to a difference in hormones, treatments, cognitive abilities or a combination of these factors.

The consequences of a brain injury can be severe for both males and females. If you incurred a brain injury due to the negligence of another person, consult with an attorney who can ensure your rights to fair and proper compensation are protected.